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Posted by on Feb 10, 2009 in Uncategorized | 3 comments

USPS Jacks Up Price of First-Class Mail Stamps

The United States Postal service announced price hikes for mailing services today, including a 2-cent increase in the price of a First-Class Mail stamp. Those stamps will be 44 cents with the price increase.

Stamps will be 44 cents starting on May 11.

Stamps will be 44 cents starting on May 11.

The changes will go into effect on May 11, which is in line with the annual review of postal mailing prices that are adjusted each may. The Postal Service estimates that this will cost the average household approximately $3 more per year for postage. In the statement released today, they made no estimation for how much this might effect small business or enterprise-level customers of the Postal Service.

“Whether you’re a consumer or run a business, the Postal Service continues to offer a good deal during a time when we’re all looking for ways to save,” said Stephen M. Kearney, senior vice president for customer relations in a statement. “Our range of shipping and mailing options and low prices make the Postal Service the smart and easy choice.”

Those wishing to get past the price increase may purchase Forever Stamps between now and May 10, which will be the same price as current First Class stamps, but will be usable when the price increase goes into effect on May 11. The USPS will likely issue 2 cent stamps for those with extra 42-cent stamps, as the Forever Stamps may not be that economical after all.

The Postal Service did not announce any additional mailing price increases today, but did note that the 17-cent additional ounce price for First Class Mail will remain in place, unchanged.

Last month, the USPS announced shipping fee increases, as we reported here.

  • Chuck Zlatkin

    If you bought Forever Stamps at 39 cents and now the rate for postage is 44 cents you would be saving 5 cents every time you used a stamp. That would seem to be an economical plus. Am I missing something?

  • Mike McMahon

    Does anybody know how to email Stephen Kearney (to express an opinion)?

  • EJ

    Even if you bought stamps for cheaper and used them at a time after stamp prices went up, they would send your mail back to you and put a note on the envelope telling you it is short the exact postage amount. I have had this happen before and am pretty sure that’s how it works now.