All You Need to Do for Stress-Free Corporate Tax Preparation

If you own a corporation or have formed an LLC, you’re required to file a corporate tax return every year. Understanding your business structure and determining the necessary documents can help you prepare your corporate tax return more easily and efficiently. This article will walk you through the most practical steps for stress-free corporate tax preparation. 

Determine if your business is an S Corporation or a C Corporation

If you establish a corporation, your business will be automatically classified as a C corporation for federal income tax purposes. A C-corporation is a traditional corporation that pays corporate income tax on its profits and pays tax on its shareholders’ salaries and dividends.

This taxation on both the corporate and individual sides is sometimes known as “double taxation.”

Small businesses can avoid double taxation by requesting to be classified as S-corps because S corporations don’t have to pay any corporate tax. S corporations’ profits and losses are passed through to their shareholders’ individual tax returns, and those profits are taxed at their individual income tax rates. 

To be qualified as an S-corp, a corporation must meet specific requirements, including: 

  • Having fewer than 100 shareholders
  • Having only one type of stock
  • Not having corporations, partnerships, or non-resident aliens as stockholders
  • Being a domestic corporation

Prepare essential information

The necessary information for corporate tax preparation includes the company name, address, employer’s ID number, date of incorporation, and total assets. The corporate financial officer will also need to provide detailed information about the corporation’s income, including: 

  • Gross revenue
  • Cost of goods sold
  • Dividends
  • Royalties
  • Interests
  • Rental costs
  • Capital gains

Claim tax-deductible expenses

Corporations are able to claim many tax-deductible expenses against income, including employee salaries, bonuses, the cost of employee health insurance, and retirement programs.

Understanding and making the best use of these deductions will help you maximize your tax savings. To claim these expenses, the corporation’s financial officers should track these details throughout the year and be able to provide complete documentation in the event of an audit. The most common tax-deductible expenses are the following:

  • Employees’ compensation, allowance, bonuses, and other salaries
  • Employees’ benefit packages
  • Repairs and maintenance fees
  • Rents
  • Taxes and licenses
  • Interests
  • Contributions to charity
  • Depreciation costs
  • Advertising costs
  • Pensions and profit-sharing plans
  • Domestic production activities

Submit essential forms for corporate tax preparation

Form 1040

If you formed an LLC or hired yourself as an employee of your corporation and gave yourself a salary, you must list that personal income on your Form 1040. Some corporations can be considered “pass-through” entities, which means a legal business entity that passes any income it makes straight to its owners, shareholders, or investors. The company’s members or owners must then list the income, profit, and losses on their individual income tax returns.

Form 1120

Form 1120 is the tax form that C corporations (and LLCs filing as corporations) use to file their income taxes. This form also includes Schedule C. This form requires basic information about the corporation, including your employer identification number, the date you incorporated, total income, a list of deductions, and employees’ compensation. Form 1120 also includes other schedules that may or may not apply to your business, such as Schedule A (containing the cost of goods sold,) and Schedule K (listing your corporation’s information, e.g., your business type).

Schedule C

Schedule C records deductions, dividends, and any profit or losses that your business incurred. On this form, you can also record essential expenses to run your business (e.g., the mileage to and from business meetings or business meal expenses). Schedule C is not a stand-alone document and is usually supported by your Form 1040 or Form 1120.

Form 1065

If you have income through a partnership, such as a limited liability partnership, you may need to file Form 1065. According to the IRS, partnerships do not pay taxes on their income. On the other hand, their profit and loss are passed on to the partners’ individual tax returns. 

Other tax forms

If you hire employees or independent contractors, you need to submit other necessary forms as well. For example, if you withhold Social Security and Medicare from your employees, you must send W-2s and W-3s to the Social Security Administration. You must also file Form 944 electronically for federal unemployment taxes. If you paid more than $600 for each independent contractor for their work or services, you must submit Form 1099-MISC. You may also need to issue Form 1099-MISC if you paid more than $10 in royalties or broker compensation. 

File your federal tax return

The type of federal tax return you file for your corporation depends on whether you’re an S-corp or a C-corp. 

S-corp owners need to file the following forms: 

  • Form 1120-S: This form contains your corporation’s income, expenses, and losses. 
  • Form K-1: This form lists your corporation’s shareholders and their share of the corporation’s income, deductions, and credits. You must also provide your shareholders with copies of their K-1 forms so they can report their share of the corporate income or loss on their individual income tax returns.

If your business is a C corporation, you’ll file a corporate tax return on Form 1120. The corporation’s dividends are then filed on the shareholder’s individual tax returns.

File your state tax returns

You’ll also have to file a state corporate income tax return based on your tax status and the state where your corporation was formed. The corporate tax rate is commonly a fixed percentage that varies by state. If your corporation and/or its owners are registered to run business in other states, they may also need to file other state tax returns.

Pay estimated corporate taxes

While C-corps must pay estimated corporate income tax, S-corps must make estimated tax payments for certain S corporation taxes. You need to submit these estimated tax payments on a quarterly basis throughout the year.

Corporations that fail to pay their estimated tax payments on time may face interest and underpayment penalties.

Corporate tax preparation can be confusing, so it would be a good idea to consult with a tax professional or a certified accountant. By that, you can understand the consequences of C-corps or S-corps taxation, identify the deadlines for paying different corporate taxes, maximize your business tax deductions, and file your tax return easily. 

Explore more about tax and tax deduction articles on the Shoeboxed blog:

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What Are The Differences Between Tax Deductions And Tax Credits?

We all like to claim tax deductions and credits when filing our tax returns. They both allow us to pay less tax—and who doesn’t like that? 

But do you know that tax deductions and tax credits lower our taxes using totally different mechanisms? In other words, they are not the same thing and many people often don’t realize this. 

So, how can you tell these two confusing concepts apart? 

Read on to find out! 

What is a tax deduction?

A deduction lowers the income subject to taxation, resulting in you paying less in taxes. In other words, before calculating how much tax you owe, you subtract deductions from your income. Common tax deductions include home office deduction, student loan interest, and retirement contributions.  

How much you can save from tax deductions depends on your marginal tax rate. Simply multiply the tax deduction by the marginal tax rate to figure out how much that deduction can decrease your taxes. For example, if you have a $2000 deduction and you fall into the 22% tax bracket, you will be able to lower your taxes by $440. So, the higher the tax bracket you’re in, the more value deductions will bring to you. 

What is a tax credit? 

A tax credit lowers the amount of taxes you owe directly. Common tax credits include the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC), the Child Tax Credit, and the Saver’s Tax Credit

It’s very simple to know how much your tax credit will save you. You don’t need any marginal tax rate or calculation. Once you meet all the requirements of a specific tax credit, subtract the value of that tax credit directly from your taxes. 

For example, let’s say you have a tax bill worth $6000 this year. A $2,000 tax credit decreases your taxes straight down dollar for dollar—now you only owe $4000 to the IRS! 

Tax deduction vs. Tax credit: Which one should you choose? 

Generally, tax credits benefit you more than tax deductions since they lower your tax bill directly. Still, if you can only take a tax credit or a deduction for the same expenses, do the math to determine which one will save you the most money possible. 

In conclusion 

Knowing how to distinguish between these two important tax terms, tax deductions and tax credits will help you file taxes quicker and more accurately and prevent you from making unfortunate costly mistakes. 

After you file your tax return, you may think the tax nightmare is over. However, to be cautious, experts advise keeping a copy of tax receipts for up to seven years in the event of audits. If you need an easy way to deal with this, Shoeboxed can help you! 

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‘The IRS Lost My Tax Return’: What You Should Do To Get Your Refund Money Back

Yes, it’s no joke that the IRS can lose your tax return. 

If you have completed your tax return and sent it to the IRS, but they then say they never received it — don’t panic. We’re here to help you, and remember, you’re not the only one caught up in this frustrating and worrying situation. 

We all know it’s not your fault, but this is Uncle Sam we’re dealing with, so keep reading to learn how to fix this problem and claim your refund back.

What should I do if the IRS lost my tax return? 

If you got a notice from the IRS saying that they never received your tax return (they most likely did receive it and lost it in the system), respond and do what they request you to do ASAP. They will likely ask you to resend a signed copy of your tax return. 

In case the IRS didn’t contact you, what you should do next depends on the original method you opted to file your tax return.

  • If you e-filed your tax return:

Whether you filed your tax return directly on the IRS website or through a third-party tax company or service like TurboTax or H&R Block, log into the account that you used to file your tax and check the status of your return. 

  • If your return was rejected: you would need to either correct the issues causing the rejections and e-file your return again or file the return by mail.
  • If the return was accepted: find and write down your declaration control number (DCN). It is a 14-digit number that is given to each tax return. Then contact the IRS at 800-829-1040 and tell them your DCN and the date you e-filed.

BONUS TIP: How to call the IRS 

To contact the IRS, dial 800-829-1040 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. local time, Monday to Friday. 

After choosing your language (press 1 for English), do NOT choose option 1, “Refund,” otherwise, you’ll be directed to an automated phone line. Instead, press 2 for “Personal Income Tax.” Then, press 1 for “Form, Tax History, or Payment,” ? press 3 “for all other questions,” ? press 2 “for all other questions.”  

After that, you should be connected with an agent.

  • If you sent your tax return by post:

If you mailed your return, print another copy and re-mail it to the IRS. Any copies of Forms W-2 for the return should be attached. If you paid the tax you owed, include a copy of your canceled check and confirmation of processed payment 

Sometimes, you may need to prove that you did put your return in the mail and sent it, so it’s best to use certified or registered mail. This way, you will be able to track your document and have a paper trail confirming you have sent it by post. 

More importantly, keep all of your receipts and photocopies of the envelope with a postmark or anything that can prove you sent it. They will serve as your concrete evidence if you need them to prove your tax return was indeed sent and the IRS lost it. 

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What’s next: When will I get my tax refund? 

Once you’ve resolved all the problems related to your returns, you enter the next ‘worrying stage’: When will I get my tax refund? No wonder why everyone hates dealing with taxes. 

Honestly, there’s nothing much you can do apart from waiting to hear from the IRS. According to the IRS, most tax refunds are issued within 21 days, while some may take longer if the return requires further review, which may be prompted by the following issues::

  • Your return includes errors
  • Your return is incomplete.
  • Your return is affected by identity theft or fraud.

The IRS will contact you by mail if extra information is needed to process your tax return.

To track and stay updated about the process of your refund, consider one of the following methods: 

  • Visit Where’s My Refund?: enter your Social Security number (SSN) or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN), filing status, and the exact amount of your refund to check your refund status. 
  • Download the IRS’s mobile app IRS2go: prepare the same above-mentioned personal information details to track your refund. 
  • Call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040 (least recommended because as you probably know, you can easily get stuck waiting to speak to an agent.) 

Final thoughts 

It’s totally understandable if you feel panicked and stressed out when the IRS doesn’t receive your tax return. However, try to remain calm, re-file your tax return or prove to the IRS you did send it, then the IRS should quickly process your refund money.  
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